Recognizing Common Signs of Aging in Your Dog

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1. Vision Loss and other Eye Problems

Has your dog begun bumping into things, falling uncontrollably or displayed signs of eye discomfort (eye redness, cloudiness, etc.)? He may be suffering from vision loss or an eye disorder. Deteriorating eyesight is part of the normal aging process for dogs. There are, however, certain things you can do to help your dog adjust. Ask your veterinarian for tips on handling dogs with vision loss and to rule out treatable eye diseases such as cataracts, dry eye syndrome, or conjunctivitis.

2. Increased/Strained Urination

Increased urination or strained urination may be an indicator of kidney disease or urinary tract infection, both of which are more commonly seen in middle-aged to older dogs. Fortunately, urinary incontinence and strained urination can often be alleviated with medication or a change in dog food. Consult your veterinarian if you suspect a problem.

For the complete slideshow on what to expect with an older dog, visit petMD.

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